If this were “Jeopardy!,” the answer would be: “What is ‘So what?’?”

Imagine being at the game and tapping a stranger on the shoulder while the game’s being played, to tell him, “Texas is 5/10 and KU is 5/9 on field-goal attempts, this half.” The guy would summon an usher, one with a straitjacket.

Kosar thought he was helping his father out of a jam, but later learned that Dad had his own $1 million contract with the team. Between that, never-paid-back loans to family and friends, and bad investments spearheaded by same, Kosar lost about $15 million.

Koonce tells of “an onslaught of requests from his family shortly after his first payday,” including from “aunts, uncles and distant cousins he barely knew.” Due to the familial connections, he found himself unable to say no. A trucking company he began with his sister cost him more than $500,000.

“Guys open up restaurants, and that is one of the most volatile industries you can get into,” said linebacker Bart Scott in the book. “[Friends] ask you to do it, and then you ask for their business plan and they say ‘What is that?’ Exactly.”

That is Marshawn Lynch mowing down Titans’ All-Pro defensive lineman Jurrell Casey. There aren’t many running backs on the planet who can do that. Lynch averaged an impressive 4.2 yards per carry in the win (18 carries, 76 yards).

Despite it all, in 1988, given his third second chance, Wilson became an important part of a 12-4 regular-season team that included Boomer Esiason at quarterback and Ickey Woods, James Brooks and Wilson as formidable, multi-tasked running backs.

But the night before that Super Bowl, the word spread: There would be no Stanley Wilson. With the game in Miami, cocaine capital of North America, he had binged that day, apparently all day — the day before the Super Bowl, for crying out loud — and he was out of it, gone, done, through.

Last heard from, Wilson in 1999 was convicted of stealing $130,000 in property from a home in Beverley Hills to feed his addiction. He was sentenced to 22 years state prison in Lancaster, Calif.

24. Adrian Peterson, running back, Vikings (12): Peterson remains a source of fascination, but for many of the wrong reasons — namely, he is a child abuser who to this day doesn’t think he did anything wrong. On the field, Peterson will take an even bigger role in Minnesota’s playoff hopes now that Teddy Bridgewater has been lost for the season.
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